Financial Advise Stock Market Crash Great Depression Inflation Deflation Bear Market Jim Shepherd's financial advisor service uses a financial investment model that 
		accurately predicts the financial long-term changes in the US financial stock market. The financial investment model used by Jim's financial advisor 
		service predicted both the 1987 and 1929 stock market crashes. Many other smaller interim financial moves also were predicted, including the
		beginning of the 2000 Bear stock market in late 1999. Both inflation and the current descent toward deflation, that was responsible for the great
		depression, are measured by this same financial investment model that has been used to predict both bear markets and new bull markets,
		far in advance of anything available in the U.S. financial markets.
Saturday December 17, 2005  
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Jim Shepherd
Jim Shepherd,
Founder and President
 
Barron's Online
Thursday, July 28, 2005 11:47AM EDT
U.S. Stocks Face Multiple Threats

Click here
to read thi s article.


the Dow could easily drop to the 5,000 or 6,000 range.

James Shepherd, editor of the Shepherd Investment Strategist in La Jolla, worries that the current level of trading -- which has been approaching 2 billion shares per day -- may begin snowballing as investors start to panic. If the current exodus of investors turns into a stampede, he fears that there could be a dramatic crash in the market.
Shepherd, who pulled his money out of the market not long before its high-water mark in 2000, said that by historical standards, the Dow could easily drop to the 5,000 or 6,000 range.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
January 1, 2003


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