Financial Advise Stock Market Crash Great Depression Inflation Deflation Bear Market Jim Shepherd's financial advisor service uses a financial investment model that 
		accurately predicts the financial long-term changes in the US financial stock market. The financial investment model used by Jim's financial advisor 
		service predicted both the 1987 and 1929 stock market crashes. Many other smaller interim financial moves also were predicted, including the
		beginning of the 2000 Bear stock market in late 1999. Both inflation and the current descent toward deflation, that was responsible for the great
		depression, are measured by this same financial investment model that has been used to predict both bear markets and new bull markets,
		far in advance of anything available in the U.S. financial markets.
Wednesday March 12, 2008  
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Jim Shepherd
Jim Shepherd,
Founder and President
 

On Feb.5, 2008
Jim Shepherd was interviewed by
Chuck Jaffe
on his 'Your Money' show

An audio file of the interview can be heard here for those who missed the interview.
Windows Media
MP3 Audio

We have gone from being the largest creditor nation, to being the largest debtor.

We have gone from being the largest creditor nation as recently as around 1980, to being the largest debtor by far: [The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis] chart is alarming, pointing out the rate at which we are sinking into dependency on debt: we are borrowing, on a current-account basis, fully 5% of our GDP so that we can continue to spend more than we produce. We are financing a significant amount of our growth! The Trend has been accelerating dramatically and the percentage is now at an all-time high. It is easy to see that borrowing continues to account for more and more of GDP (much of the consumer spending was related to record mortgage-refinancing in the third quarter) Is it possible to indefinitely spend more than you produce? Is it possible for an economy to rely fully 70% on consumption (as indicated in the recent GDP data) and still maintain its stature?

- James A. Shepherd
Barrons, Market Watch
December 12, 2003


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